Atlas Foundry

 

Incorporated in May 1912 the Atlas Steel Foundry and Engineering Co., Ltd., commenced production of steel castings in January 1913.

It was the Atlas Foundry which provided most of the heavy armour for the Dreadnoughts at the Battle of Jutland 1916.

It catered at that time for general engineering work rather than for high-pressure castings which became a speciality in 1956. After the 1914-18 war a completely new foundry building was completed. This building housed the moulding, melting, and rough-dressing processes. The buildings covered a floor area of 142,750 sq. ft. on a site area of 27 acres.

Castings up to 8.5 tons in weight were in regular production in plain carbon and alloy steels. The first turbine cylinder was manufactured in 1918, and the firm were amongst the largest producers in Britain of such castings for power plants. They also had a good connection with main marine engine builders.

Production of these specialized castings did not lend itself to mechanization and thus there was a high percentage of skilled craftsmen in the 350 personnel employed.

In 1967 there was a reverse take-over by North British Steel Foundry.

Mons Meg (the 'one o'clock cannon' from Edinburgh Castle) was serviced there in 1980.

Read more from 1956 Institution of Mechanical Engineers  here

Read more from Armadale.org.uk here 

north british steel

Atlas and West Lothian Foundries centre of photo  with Etna and Atlas Brickworks in Foreground

Atlas and West Lothian Foundries centre of photo with Etna and Atlas Brickworks in Foreground

Aerial Photo looking east over West Lothian Foundry in the Foreground and Atlas Foundry centre photograph

Aerial Photo looking east over West Lothian Foundry in the Foreground and Atlas Foundry centre photograph

View of Atlas Foundry from Church Place/The Marches

View of Atlas Foundry from Church Place/The Marches

The land where the foundry stood is now housing. Here it is during the great snow of December 2010